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Introduction: Encouraging usage

Using Writing for University Courses within your courses
and modules

Feedback

What the Written English Feedback Sheets cover

Uses of the Written English Feedback Sheets

Written English Feedback Sheet - Starter Level

Written English Feedback Sheet - Development Level

 


 


 


Using Writing for University Courses within your courses and modules

Where to locate it in your course

It may be helpful to discuss as a course team how and where Writing for University Courses can be used within a course, to avoid over-repeating similar activities. However, reinforcing the importance of writing well and the usefulness of Writing for University Courses throughout all levels and in all modules is very helpful. The evaluation of Writing for University Courses indicated that such continual reinforcement is very important in encouraging usage.

Access

Students can access Writing for University Courses by going to the Student Intranet, clicking on 'Key Skills' under 'Learning Centre' and then clicking on Writing for University Courses.

Writing for University Courses is on open access from any computer at any campus at Sheffield Hallam University. When accessing it off-campus, a dialog box will appear and students will need their log-in and password.

Suggestions for use

Some of these suggestions may seem more helpful or feasible to you than others for your students and your course.

Introducing students to Writing for University Courses

  • Give information about Writing for University Courses in course and module handbooks.
  • Link to Writing for University Courses from Blackboard courses.
  • Link to specific parts of Writing for University Courses which students particularly need, from Blackboard courses.

Class/learning activities

  • Show Writing for University Courses to students in class (i.e. a computer suite) and ask them to work on part of it (e.g. a Skill Check) to familiarise themselves with it.
  • Suggest students use Writing for University Courses for a specific written task to help them improve their grades/marks, rather than directing them to it as a general resource.
  • Consolidate usage of Writing for University Courses by having an introductory class activity followed a few weeks later by a further activity.

Using assessment and feedback

  • Students complete 'Self Tests' and 'Skill Checks', and submit the results along with a commentary how they used Writing for University Courses to help them improve.
  • Students submit two versions of a short piece of work: one before using Writing for University Courses and a revised version after using it, highlighting the changes made.
  • Students write a short piece, tutor provides feedback on it (see 'Feedback sheets' in the menu), student rewrites the piece using Writing for University Courses and resubmits.
  • Students submit a short preliminary piece of work (e.g. a proposal) and are given feedback on their writing (see 'Feedback sheets' in the menu), and are then directed to Writing for University Courses to help them write the final part (e.g. the actual project report or dissertation).
  • Assessment criteria include ones relating to standard of writing for assessed work, making it clear to how marks/grades have been influenced by their writing skills; direct them to Writing for University Courses to use in producing their next assignment.
  • Provide feedback to students on their writing (e.g. in an early assignment at each level of the course- see 'Feedback sheets' in the menu) and direct them to Writing for University Courses.
  • Ask students to peer review each other's work, using the Check your Work sections in Writing for University Courses and using the Advice where they are unsure. Review in the whole group what students commonly had difficulty with.
  • Give students printed copies of the Check your Work sections, ask them to use them to check work before submitting it, ticking off the items, and then to hand them in along with the work.

 

 

© Learning & Teaching Institute, Sheffield Hallam University 2004